For the third year in a row the Optima Ultimate Street Car Invitational was held at the Spring Mountain Motorsports Ranch in Pahrump, Nevada. This event was launched in 2009 to show that SEMA-quality show cars could throw down hard in various driving exercises. After all, what better way to show that all these aftermarket suspension and driveline widgets can convert ill-handling classic iron into supercars than to flog them on the track? At the inaugural event a Camaro snagged the top spot, but last year a wicked-fast, full-tilt AC Cobra took the crown. The fact that Camaros occupied Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Place didn’t make us feel better at all. A Camaro needed to be on top again, and we didn’t really care which one.

The Rules

As this event has grown, the rules have had to adapt in order to keep everything fair. This year the old method of accumulating the times was thankfully ditched. Under the previous scoring system, around 70 percent of the score was determined on the road course, and no matter how someone did in any other aspect of the event it had little effect on the overall score. So basically, if you won the road course you most likely won the whole deal. This year all three driving competitions (road course, autocross, and speed stop challenge) were moved to a points system where the top 20 finishers were awarded from 25 (First Place) to 1 point (20th place). This meant the cars had to excel in all three areas to win the big prize.

The build quality and style portion was changed as well. It was still an important part of the overall contest, but it was now weighted less than the driving events. On the big course there was a warm up lap, followed by three timed laps and then one cool down lap. The cars were sent out individually and spaced far enough apart to avoid passing.

Drivers were also given three chances to nail down a fast time on the autocross. Hitting a cone resulted in a 1.5-second penalty, and getting lost in the cones earned the driver a big fat DNF. The competitor’s best time in each event would be used to determine their point accumulation, so you really only needed one killer lap or run.

Wheelmen

In an effort to keep ringers from being stuffed behind the wheel, the owner/builder rule was tightened up a bit with a builder defined as someone who has worked on at least 70 percent of the

Check out camaroperformers.com for some in-car video action!

The Rules

As this event has grown, the rules have had to adapt in order to keep everything fair. This year the old method of accumulating the times was thankfully ditched. Under the previous scoring system, around 70 percent of the score was determined on the road course, and no matter how someone did in any other aspect of the event it had little effect on the overall score. So basically, if you won the road course you most likely won the whole deal. This year all three driving competitions (road course, autocross, and speed stop challenge) were moved to a points system where the top 20 finishers were awarded from 25 (First Place) to 1 point (20th place). This meant the cars had to excel in all three areas to win the big prize.

The build quality and style portion was changed as well. It was still an important part of the overall contest, but it was now weighted less than the driving events. On the big course there was a warm up lap, followed by three timed laps and then one cool down lap. The cars were sent out individually and spaced far enough apart to avoid passing.

Drivers were also given three chances to nail down a fast time on the autocross. Hitting a cone resulted in a 1.5-second penalty, and getting lost in the cones earned the driver a big fat DNF. The competitor’s best time in each event would be used to determine their point accumulation, so you really only needed one killer lap or run.