Factory-built small-block muscle doesn’t get much better than a First-Gen Z/28. What the high-winding little 302 may have lacked in torque was more than made up for in top-end fun. In later years the Z/28 would become more of an exterior dress-up package with little in the way of performance mods to back it up. But in 1967 the Z/28 was in its purest form. There were no badges to warn the Ricky Racer in the next lane that innocently pulled up next to it. In some ways this stealthy look may have contributed to the low production run of only 602 units. Most musclecars buyers wanted flash, looks were almost as important as performance. GM really didn’t care as long as they produced enough to get the engine eligible for racing on the Trans-Am circuit where the Z/28s showed their true potential.

The Z pictured here was purchased new in Arizona by Albert Bricklin, the son of Malcolm Bricklin, designer/builder of the gullwinged Bricklin sports car. The Camaro stayed with Bricklin’s untill the mid-’70s and then traded hands several times during the next 10 years until in

<table style="width: 471px; height: 399px;"><tbody><tr><td colspan="1"> OWNER  <br></td><td colspan="1"> Brett Radanof, Roseville, CA</td></tr><tr><td> VEHICLE</td><td>   ’67 Z/28</td></tr><tr><td> ENGINE</td><td> ’67 302, balanced and blueprinted, GM crossram with Holley 4295 600cfm double pumpers, GM off-road solid cam, ’69 GM transistorized ignition, factory headers and chambered exhaust.</td></tr><tr><td> TRANSMISSION</td><td> ’67 Muncie M-21</td></tr><tr><td> SUSPENSION</td><td> Restored stock with 12-bolt 4.10:1 Posi</td></tr><tr><td>  WHEELS <br></td><td> GM Ralleys with DF code 15x6s</td></tr><tr><td>  TIRES <br></td><td> Goodyear Redline 15/7.75s</td></tr></tbody></table>