Despite the cubic gallons of blood red indigenous to many a Ferrari, Stuart went low key. Sure, the Camaro is settled right, has formidable rollers, razor-straight sheetmetal, and cuts the atmosphere in flawless coats of black, it is at once subtle and striking in its simplicity. Anderson and Nowak did replace the quarter panels and blocked out the body for a few centuries until it was time for Anderson to bestow the PPG base and clear coats. As accompaniment, Powder Plus prepped the centers of the Profil wheels with a dusky shade that compliments the onyx body and helps to minimize the inevitable accumulation of brake dust.

Other outward changes are minimal and subtle, stuff that would stand out only to the trained eye. The ZL2 cowl hood stands alone, but the rear bumper was narrowed, relieved of bumper bolts and replated by Advanced Plating. In proximity, the taillight nacelles were hewn from billet stock and flash LED brake and turn signals. Finally, Marquez Design in West Sacramento, California, supplied the driving lights and attendant panel as well as the billet side-marker bezels.

While the builder and the owner could have lost propriety in minimal design speckled with bits of billet and custom panels detracting from the simplicity of the whole, they stuck with stock. Autokraft laid in ACC carpeting as a field for the Arizen RS-like seats that were customized for the application and upholstered by Kurt Anderson in familiar houndstooth bordered by genuine cow hide. DSE provided the dashboard assembly to showcase the Auto Meter Ultra-Lite II gauges and to mount the Vintage Air controls, a Hurst flat-stick shifter juts cleanly from the transmission tunnel, and a Budnik Sport steering wheel is the cherry on top.

Now the killer: According to Kurt, "I don't think this car will ever turn a wheel." Mayim had this beauty built as a prop for his showroom floor, a lounge lizard, a pathetic beauty that no one but Ferrari customers are likely to see much less hear on the open road. To motorheads, that's something slightly less than criminal. Or so it would seem.