The Davis crew made nice with lots of polishing (cylinder block and heads) and chromium coatings for the oil pan, rocker covers, pumps, pulleys, and A/C compressor. Ancillaries include a Ron Davis two-row aluminum core, Vintage Air Super Cooler, and HPC-coated Art Morrison headers leaded to a Kenny Davis-built custom 3-inch exhaust system joined by an X-pipe and interrupted only slightly by Flowmaster Super 40 growlers. For extreme measures, like fleeing the vulture, Larry had KD mount a Nitrous Express equalizer under the trunk lid.

Absorbing and dispersing said grunt falls to a McLeod clutch assembly and flywheel contained by a Lakewood blast shield, Tremec TKO five-speed controlled by a MasterShift paddle shifter (converts linkage from top shift to cable driven), and an aluminum prop shaft by Larry's Driveshaft in Lowell, Arkansas. The rear axle is a chromoly replica of a 9-inch, holding a 3.70:1 ring-and-pinion. The differential is nestled in a three-link rear suspension system by Lateral Dynamics in Carlsbad, California. It consists of front and rear crossmembers, beaucoup bracing webbing the third member, two lateral links, and an extremely stout Watts link, realizing the epitome of high-speed control. Bracing for this system includes an interior fixture that laps the driveshaft tunnel and provides the forward attachment points for the links.

Staying under the radar is easy; as part of its repertoire, the Camaro is quite able to flop flat on the pavement, like a cat wiggling under a low fence, by virtue of its RideTech suspension system. ShockWaves are at each end of the chassis and DSE mini-tubs, and Art Morrison subframe and subframe connectors complement the whole. Corvette C5 spindles, polished control arms, and ShockWaves support and tailor the frontend attitude. Big brakes? You bet. Dual master cylinders actuate Wilwood six-piston clampers working over 14-inch vented discs. At the rear of the chassis are four-piston calipers on 14-inch plates. Rollers are an amalgam of 19x8 (5.5-inch b/s) and 20x10 (5.0-inch b/s) Rushforth Rated X wheels and 215/35ZR and 285/30ZR BFGoodrich KDW2 rubber bands.

KD Hot Rods added more than a little glamor to the project by smoothing the firewall flat and juxtaposing it with a slickly retrenched engine compartment, the perfect backdrop for that sparkling all-alloy grunt-ball. And there's a whole bunch going on between the doors that doesn't immediately hit the eye. Though it appears stock, albeit embellished, it isn't any such thing. Understated is what it is, and all of it built by hand. For this phase, the car spent many hours at Tracy Weaver's celebrated ('06 Riddler Award, for instance) Recovery Room Interiors in Plattsmouth, Nebraska.

Weaver's cohesive force built the low-back buckets and the sculpted door and rear panels, smoothed out the headliner, constructed the console, removed the rear seat and fashioned a kind of package tray à la a fastback coupe. While it lends a special appearance to the Camaro, the package tray sub-structure also affords stiffness to the body. They did the dashboard in the factory style, but again crafted the entire structure by hand. In the custom dashboard, they sunk comprehensive Classic Instruments in two-cluster housing machined out of billet by Joe McCullough. A Billet Specialties Indy steering wheel anoints the custom-length column. Recovery Room took on the audio system with a power head (brand unknown) and channeled its produce through a Kicker amplifier and a series of Kicker speakers.