Sliding into the driver seat, Mike is greeted with a nice Budnik billet steering wheel and a set of custom gauges. The seats are a performance-inspired set of Corbeaus that are sure to keep him in place during the hard cornering that this Camaro is more than capable. The rear seat was narrowed to accomodate the mini-tubs, and custom-upholstered to match the Corbeau seats up front. A Detroit Speed rollbar holds the car together in a much stiffer fashion than what The General had in mind when the car was originally bolted together. But then again, the boys at the factory had no idea their cars would still be making waves like this some 40 years after they rolled off the assembly line.

With just over eight months invested in this build, it's amazing what a team of quality designers, fabricators, and painters can accomplish in such a short period of time. It's this kind of work and attention to detail that pays off down the road. In fact, the Camaro caught our eye on its maiden voyage at a local Houston area cruise.

Future plans include taking the Camaro to several larger shows, but Mike's main intention is to drive the car like it was meant to be: All-out.

Maybe it's just us, but shouldn't that be the intention of all Camaro owners?

We think so.