The project got kicked up a level when Colby began work on the suspension. It started off innocently enough, with Air Ride Technologies components called for all around. The original plan, however, was for lowered leaf springs and 275-width tires, which Colby decided he just couldn’t do. I knew I wanted more, and that’s when I crossed the line, he told us. With that, this Camaro came out of the shadows, off the back burner, and Donaldson, with his accomplice Scott Risleyan accomplished fabricator who works in the movie car businessdecided to make this ’69 Camaro a top-tier car. And the first step down that road was to stick some extra fat rubber under this thing: 315s on 20-inch rims, with a total tire height of 29 inches, and to do it without any rubbing. Ambitious? Donaldson admits that he goes through phases while building a car, as his imagination propels him to interesting places. To get the ultra-slammed, sinister stance he wanted, Colby and Risley actually moved the ShockWave upper crossmember into the trunk area. To accommodate the new position while maintaining proper geometry for the double adjustable ShockWaves, the pair preceded to radius the upper Air Ride control links to curve around the axle tubes. Earl Williams of Williams Classic Chassis (La Verne, California) then went to work, creating new, thicker, double-adjustable lower control links, along sano new lower axle mounts, creating a custom triangulated four-bar setup to locate the stout Moser 12-bolt rearend (filled with 33-spline axles, a True-Trac diff, and 4.10:1 gears) that he had narrowed 3 inches on each side. And although Colby had already fitted the ’69 with Detroit Speed Deep Tubs to accommodate the mondo rear rubber, Donaldson and Risley guaranteed there’d be no tire rubbing by completely reconstructing the outer fenderwells to obtain the needed space.

In comparison, the front suspension, though trick in itself, seems almost tame. An Air Ride Street Challenge Kit got the call, including 2-inch drop spindles, double-adjustable Shock Waves, tubular upper and lower control arms, and a MuscleBar swaybar. Along with a Detroit Speed ceramic-coated steering gearbox, all was bolted to the now radically transformed Camaro’s original front subframe, which was now securely tied into the trick rearend with DSE weld-in subframe connectors. Braking duties are handled by a tried and true Wilwood setup: 14-inch rotors and six-piston calipers up front, 13-inch platters with four-piston binders in the back, both done in a touch of red to set off the otherwise stealth-black exterior. A Wilwood aluminum master cylinder bolstered by a CPP Hydro-boost setup ensures eye-bulging stopping power. Earl Williams also made his mark up front, creating the same inner fenderwells, which perfectly match the Donaldson/Risley created smoothed firewall, and also hides all the wiring, thanks to diligent work by Colby’s friend and wiring wiz, Carlos Warlick of SW Motorsports (Sun Valley, California). It all rolls on Boze three-piece forged wheels, 20x11 out back and 18x8.5 up front, custom powdercoated and fitted with custom CNC’d knock-off caps, and wrapped in Continental Sport Contact rubber, 315/35ZR20 snuggled into the back, 245/40ZR18s up front.