Racing a late-model Z06 on a road course is a shot in the arm, for sure. It’s a performance car of high expectations, but Dave was also looking forward to the experience of taking a vintage muscle car through the same challenges as his 'Vette. To meet his high-end cornering expectations, the aforementioned Schwartz chassis was fitted with 2-inch drop spindles along with tubular A-arms up front. With the four-bar coilover suspension bringing down the rear 2 inches, the stage was set but not completed until the QA1 double adjustable shocks were mounted on all four corners.

Slid behind the Forgeline SS3P wheels (18x9 front, 18x12.5 rear) the quadruple helping of 14-inch Wilwood plates manage a sincere stopping arrangement and award Dave steeper speeds going into the corners. Michelin PS2 rubber (255/35-18 front, 335/30-18 rear) confirms the juiced suspension works to the top its abilities.

As with most cars of the Pro Touring scene, a race-inspired theme is heavily pronounced throughout the driver’s quarters. Sparco leather-covered seats offer a comfort zone for the pilot and passenger, while the R.J.S. five-point harness provide a secure strategy. The cockpit’s racing inspiration continues with the Autometer gauges, B&M shifter, and custom console. A Schwartz six-point rollcage offers the necessary safety measures with an additional dose of chassis stiffness. Those are Year One door panels, with fresh glass provided by NPD.

Schwartz Performance prepped the fresh sheetmetal while Chad Ruff splashed on the PPG Marina Blue pigment and Mark Turner applied the white stripe package. Motorsports Powder Coating matched the paint and managed the final touches to what has developed into a first-gen convertible that’s mellow enough for everyday street driving or weekend fun ripping up the turns at any road course or autocross.

It’s yet to be determined weather or not Dave’s beautiful convertible is capable of keeping up with his Corvette at the track, but without a doubt, this powerful Camaro will have no problem keeping up the the Jones,’ or any other family’s hot rod roaming his hometown streets of Buffalo, New York.

Apparently, the car had twisted and moved when the floors were out because none of the doors and windows lined up. Neither did the hood or deck lid. This car was a total mess.”