Keeping with true street fashion and a simple scene, the interior lacks the racing motif one might expect. Even though the stock CD head unit remains in the dash, it’s safe to say the majority of the music going through Greg’s head comes straight from the twin-turbo–powered symphony of eight. The GM seats and gauges are stock offerings. Besides the custom LRT Racing rollcage (certified at 8.5 sec. and above), the Turbo Action Cheetah steering wheel, and Simpson five-point camlock racing harness lead on that this F-body means serious drag racing business.

Before Greg purchased it, the car was mainly used for R&D purposes by Izzo and the crew at Speed Inc. Needless to say, the mileage was kept low (4,300 when Greg bought it) and the fourth-gen’s pigment retained the original Sunset Orange Metallic’s attractive luster over it’s 10-year life span.

Greg does his part in keeping the car in show-car shape by protecting the rear quarters from rock chips and burnt rubber on race days by taping on a layer cellophane wrap. Call him anal retentive or just a Camaro guy who likes to keep his stuff nice. Regardless, the car gets a good amount of street time, but is more at home on the dragstrip.

“The biggest rush for me was taking the car to the dragstrip for the first time,” recalls Greg. “The half-track charge a turbo car makes is incredible. It just keeps thrusting your back against the seat. I still haven’t pushed it to the limit, so I’m hoping to improve my times.”

We’ve seen Greg’s car in action on the strip at the LSX Shootout in Indy, and we’re happy to report that we didn’t have the misfortune of lining up against him at the tree. That would have been one huge head start advantage for us, and what might have felt like an eternity for Greg going up against ours or any other 13-second fourth-gen for that matter.

The half-track charge a turbo car makes is incredible. It just keeps thrusting your back against the seat.