Besides a set of custom-built subframe connectors, the Camaro’s suspension was stock. With plenty of room for improvement, Shaun chose Hotchkis 1-inch lowering springs on all four corners as the prescription for the ailing stance. Hotchkis sway bars (17/16-inch hollow up front and 1-inch solid out back), trailing arms, Panhard rod, and poly bushings joined by Bilstein shocks turned the otherwise average ride into a capable competitor on the autocross and road course while still retaining a comfortable ride on the street.

The Evod Muscle Star wheels (17x9) on each corner with brushed hoops and polished centers set the performance-driven exterior tone, while JFZ calipers and 12-inch rotors scrub off steam and are managed by a Tilton dual master cylinder setup. Keeping in compliance with the treadwear parameters of many of today’s street car events, Shaun wrapped Nitto NT05 275/45R-17 around the attractive rollers on all four corners.

A custom-built rollcage, Recaro front seats, five-point harness, and the non-existent rear seats solidify the notion that racing is the main focus of this F-body. The stereo head unit exists only to fill an otherwise unattractive void in the dash. Auto Meter gauges housed in a custom-built cluster keep Shaun informed and an Auto Meter shift light demand he hammers the Hurst shifter at just the right moment.

With the lack of road time the car has seen over the years, the original factory GM white paint remains in near flawless condition—a far cry from the general population of 25-year-old Camaros.

Shaun confesses he’s not looking forward to those first rock chips to make their unwelcome debut, but those pesky freckles will only add some character to a car that has otherwise led a sheltered life long enough. Besides, most cars of this vintage would be on paintjob number two, at least.

With this car being built to race and have fun with, it’s time to get this party started. It’s not like it’s the only third-gen with just a little over 300 miles on the odometer … or is it?